Link: Uber and Self-Driving Cars Have More Than a ‘Trolley Problem’ – The Atlantic

A 50-year-old philosophical thought experiment has been central to the debate about autonomous vehicles. It’s time to give it up.

Ian Bogost: “When engineers, critics, journalists, or ordinary people adopt the trolley problem as a satisfactory (or even just a convenient) way to think about autonomous-vehicle scenarios, they are refusing to consider the more complex moral situations in which these apparatuses operate.”

Source: Uber and Self-Driving Cars Have More Than a ‘Trolley Problem’ – The Atlantic

China to bar people with bad ‘social credit’ from planes, trains

This is a stark example of using informational tools and online data to control citizens’ access to rights and benefits- according to the principle “once untrustworthy, always restricted”.

Source: China to bar people with bad ‘social credit’ from planes, trains

The Future of Artificial Intelligence and its Impact on Society | Council on Foreign Relations

THOMPSON: All right. Hello, everybody. Welcome to the closing session of the Council on Foreign Relations 22nd Annual Term Member Conference with Ray…

Source: The Future of Artificial Intelligence and its Impact on Society | Council on Foreign Relations

The avent of ‘datatorial’ regimes

WIRED: Big data meets Big Brother as China moves to rate its citizens
The Chinese government plans to launch its Social Credit System in 2020. The aim? To judge the trustworthiness – or otherwise – of its 1.3 billion residents

Big data meets Big Brother as China moves to rate its citizens | WIRED UK

Welcome to E-stonia! E-residence and Citizenship in an Electronic Republic

Costica Dumbrava | A citizen with a view | published on GLOBALCIT blog, European University Institute | September 2015


In 2014 Estonia launched an e-residence scheme through which non-resident foreigners could obtain an Estonian digital identity card. The digital card allows people to access a series of digital services such as enabling them to create and use electronic signatures, launch and manage companies, do online banking, etc. The procedure for obtaining the card is quite simple. Apart from providing several standard items such as application form, national ID, and personal photo, the applicants must pay a fee (€50 in 2014) and submit a written explanation “concerning the intention to use the digital ID and the circumstance of its use”. If granted, the digital card will be issued within 15 days. The policy rationale for the Estonian e-residency card is economic. The emphasis is on encouraging entrepreneurship and attracting business by removing administrative barriers as well as bypassing migration regulations. By aiming to attract 10 million e-Estonians by 2025 in a country of 1.3 million citizens, the government seeks to boost Estonia’s competitiveness on the global market. This adds to other Estonian business friendly measures such as tax-free for profit reinvestment and championing digital services. Notwithstanding the economic merits of the e-residence scheme, it is worth exploring its implications for citizenship. Is e-residence a membership status? Does e-residence triggers claims of membership as physical residence usually does?

Continue reading